Just Added to Our Digital Collections: Eagle Tavern Images

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We’re continuing with the project we started this summer, digitizing materials related to our historic buildings in Greenfield Village. This week, we’ve added images of Eagle Tavern. Today, Eagle Tavern is a great place to have a historically authentic meal or beverage (either temperance or non-temperance). However, when Henry Ford acquired it in 1927 from its original location in Clinton, Michigan, the building was in a state of deep disrepair. This sheet shows this poor condition from a couple of different angles. Visit our collections website to view nearly 100 artifacts depicting or related to Eagle Tavern.

Ellice Engdahl is Digital Collections & Content Manager at The Henry Ford.

Recipe: The Henry Ford’s Kale Salad

Salads, like this selection of ready-to-go options offered at The Henry Ford, are a great choice for a healthier lunch for students.

Salads, like this selection of ready-to-go options offered at The Henry Ford, are a great choice as a healthier lunch for students.

Looking for an easy salad to make that’s both healthy and good tasting? Try our simple kale salad, a favorite recipe from Executive Chef Mike Trombley that is often served to Henry Ford Academy students here at The Henry Ford.

In an ongoing effort to provide nutritious and crowd-pleasing menu items to our students that meet the nutrition guidelines provided by the USDA, Chef Mike and his team add ingredients like garlic, beets and other items with bold flavor to lunch dishes as they try to avoid relying too much on ingredients such as salt and butter. The resulting combination is a healthy dish that’s good for the students.

Try adding this salad to your next meal for a dose of greens you’ll look forward to enjoying.

The Henry Ford’s Kale Salad
Ingredients

  • 4 ounces baby kale, or tender leaf kale
  • 4 each cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 2 Tbsp dried cranberries
  • 2 Tbsp shredded carrot
  • 2 Tbsp toasted sunflower seeds
  • 1 Tbsp low sodium feta cheese
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  •  1 Tbsp olive oil

Method
Layer kale and additional items then drizzle lemon juice and oil over top and enjoy.

Rebecca Hillary is a Media & Film Relations Intern at The Henry Ford.

Hanukkah: Festival of Lights

American society became more child-centered as the birthrate climbed after World War II. Like other aspects of American life during this “baby boom” era, Jewish ritual observances in the home became more child-focused, as reflected in this 1953 publication. (Object ID.2005.29.32) (Gift of Judith E. Endelman and William D. Epstein in memory of Miriam Ruth Epstein)

American society became more child-centered as the birthrate climbed after World War II. Like other aspects of American life during this “baby boom” era, Jewish ritual observances in the home became more child-focused, as reflected in this 1953 publication. (Object ID.2005.29.32) (Gift of Judith E. Endelman and William D. Epstein in memory of Miriam Ruth Epstein)

The Jewish holiday of Hanukkah celebrates the victory of the few and the weak over the mighty and the strong.  Legends and stories surround the holiday’s origins, whose name means “dedication” in Hebrew.

For centuries, Hanukkah was a modest occasion, a minor holiday. Jewish law and custom only required the lighting of candles for eight nights, with one candle to be used as the shamash (“guard” or “servant” in Hebrew) to light the others. The lighted candles were to be kept by a window where they could be seen by passers-by. In Eastern Europe, the celebration included eating latkes (potato pancakes), distributing small amounts of Hanukkah gelt (coins) to children, playing games with a dreidel (a spinning top), and playing cards. Continue reading

Five Must-see Attractions on a Cross-Country Road Trip

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Expedia Viewfinder and The Henry Ford teamed up to discuss some of the best places to visit.

Expedia Viewfinder and Henry Ford Museum teamed up to discuss some of the best places to visit.

Expedia Viewfinder and Henry Ford Museum teamed up to discuss some of the best places to visit.

Henry Ford’s invention of the Model T put Americans in the driver’s seat. His affordable automobile made everything from running errands and commuting to work to taking Sunday drives and embarking on road trips possible for ordinary people. The Model T transformed the way Americans traveled and paved the road for the future of vehicles.

Expedia Viewfinder discovered that Henry Ford Museum refreshed its Driving America exhibit not too long ago, and we got to thinking about how these antique vehicles have contributed to our own opportunities for modern-day travel. With a set of wheels, we can tour unique corners of the country and witness unrivaled beauty at our leisure. Since it was Henry Ford who made road tripping possible in the first place, it only seemed fitting to partner up with The Henry Ford, home of the country’s premier automotive museum, to discuss some of our favorite routes and roadside attractions.

Some of the nation’s most scenic areas are best viewed from behind the steering wheel with the windows rolled down. So on your next open-road adventure, buckle up, rev your engine, and cruise over to these must-see attractions: Continue reading

Soybeans: Henry Ford’s Miracle Crop

This model was used to demonstrate the soybean extraction process at several world’s fairs in the 1930s. (THF 153893)

This model was used to demonstrate the soybean extraction process at several world’s fairs in the 1930s. (THF 153893)

Soybeans: A New Hope for Farmers
In the 1920s, following his success with the Model T, Henry Ford increasingly turned his attention to transforming farming—the life he sought to escape as a boy.  He focused on finding new products and new markets for agriculture. (The charcoal briquette was an early result of this effort, made from surplus wood scrap.)

In 1928, Ford started the Chemical Lab (the building in Greenfield Village now known as the Soybean Lab), and asked Robert Boyer, a student at the Ford Trade School to run it.  Ford told Boyer to select good students from the Trade School to staff the Lab. Ford then set them to experimenting with all manner of agricultural produce, from cantaloupes to rutabagas. Continue reading

Just Added to Our Digital Collections: Winter-Themed Prints

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Like it or not, winter is just around the corner, and here at The Henry Ford, we are preparing. Curator of Photographs and Prints Cynthia Miller already selected some holiday-themed Thomas Nast material for digitization last month, and now she has added a selection of winter-themed prints, including this early 19th century engraving of an 18th century snowstorm. If you’re sure you’re ready for winter, check out some of her other selections, depicting sleigh racing, moonlit ice skating, a snowed-in Boston street, and woodlands in winter, or visit our online collections to browse all of our digitized collections relating to winter. If you’re not quite ready for snow and cold weather, we suggest this photochrom of a California orange grove instead, where the only snow to be seen is on a distant mountaintop.

Ellice Engdahl is Digital Collections & Content Manager at The Henry Ford.

Innovative Tinkering at Henry Ford Museum

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Christmas trees are a well-known holiday emblem and originate from a tradition dating all the way back to the 16th century. Though today most trees are raised by sustainable tree farms (like those for sale here at The Henry Ford), they weren’t always cut with a regard for the environment. That’s why this holiday season The Henry Ford is all about celebrating innovation and sustainability with some of our seasonal activities.

cctThis Saturday we’re hosting the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree on its way to The White House as it wraps up its 2014 tour. During its afternoon stay the tree will be on display in front of Henry Ford Museum. You can autograph the sleeve covering the tree and see a 1905 ranger and his horse nearby, where you can learn about cutting your own tree from National Forest land and how to re-utilize Christmas trees.

Inside the museum you can visit the U.S. Forest Service Research and Forest Products Lab. The lab showcases some of the innovations being studied at The Forests Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisc., which has housed experiments in using wood as a resource for the past 100 years. Their display focuses on how to engineer a wooden baseball bat so that it will have less chance of breaking or splintering, and will feature how the bat is manufactured, as well as innovations to make it safer. Continue reading

The Henry Ford’s 2015 Printable Calendar

2015 Printable Calendar

2015 Printable Calendar

Already on the hunt for a 2015 calendar for your office or home? We’ve got you covered. Our 2015 printable calendar, designed by Creative Services Manager Cheryl Preston, features images from our collections and across our campuses. The calendar prints two up on an 8.5″ by 11″ piece of paper of your choice. Simply cut each sheet in half and hang up. We’ve even included a bonus piece of art with a quote from Thomas Edison as well as a page for December 2014. You can download the calendar here.

Lish Dorset is Social Media Manager at The Henry Ford.

Dyeing Wool the Colonial Way

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It was crisp morning at the far end of the Village when I came in to work on a Sunday last month, sunshine hitting the fallen leaves and brightening up the inside of the 1760 Daggett Farmhouse. It was a perfect day for wool dyeing in the way of the colonial time period, and just about the time of year that Anna Daggett herself may have had some time to experiment with colors. Continue reading

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