Invent Music with Multiplexica2014

CG IIIVeteran musician and Maker Faire Detroit inventor Curtis Glatter will be hosting a workshop about his newest multi-functional musical invention called Multiplexica2014 during our final Tinker. Hack. Invent. Saturday for November as our communnity maker. Four years in the making, the invention premiered at Maker Faire Detroit in 2014. We had an opportunity to ask Curtis a few questions about Multiplexica2014.

Tell us about Multiplexica2014.
The most recent invention that I presented at The Henry Ford at the Detroit Maker Faire in 2014 is called the Multiplexica2014 can be utilized in a small or large format but it has taken over four years to experiment and construct an invention in which “ideas can spring to mind and instantly be utilized and recorded within seconds by playing a group of found objects with your hands and feet.” Continue reading

Before Meets After: Conserving Our Grecian Couch

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Our graceful Grecian couch is about 200 years old and is believed to have been made in the workshop of Duncan Phyfe in New York City. In its time, this couch was considered the best piece of upholstered furniture in a well-appointed parlor of a sophisticated New Yorker. Although these couches seem to be designed for reclining, they were not intended for repose. They were used by fashionable ladies and gentlemen, who sat in a rigid, upright position. Today, we would find sitting on this couch very uncomfortable.

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It is amazing that such a specialized piece survived intact into the early 20th century, when it was acquired by The Henry Ford. This is perhaps due to the flamboyant design of the back and foot rests, which makes it an exceptionally elegant, almost sculptural, piece of furniture. The couch was last reupholstered in 1954 by Ernest LoNano, a well-known furniture restorer of the time. Since then, the upholstery had become quite dirty and worn. Continue reading

Just Added to Our Digital Collections: Ford Rouge Factory Tour Vehicles

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You might have heard that there are big changes afoot at the Ford Rouge Center: production has recently started on the all-new 2015 F-150, featuring an aluminum-alloy body and bed. As part of this change, we’ve been enhancing the Ford Rouge Factory Tour experience, and we’ve also taken advantage of the production line’s downtime to digitize the vehicles you’ll see in the Legacy Gallery.  You can now check out glamour shots of the 1929 Ford Model A Roadster, the 1932 Ford V-8 Victoria, the 1949 Ford V-8 Club Coupe, the 1965 Ford Mustang Convertible, and, last but not least, the 1956 Ford Thunderbird Convertible shown here—all part of the legacy of the Rouge.  Visit our collections website to see these vehicles, as well as much more material related to the history of the Rouge.

Ellice Engdahl is Digital Collections & Content Manager at The Henry Ford.

Vote Now: 2015 Candy Cane Color Challenge

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For more than a decade our Greenfield Village handcrafted glass candy canes have been both a member and guest favorite within the stores at The Henry Ford. The reveal of each year’s color combinations, selected by our artisans, is an anxiously-awaited announcement among collectors. As we continue to produce items for the current holiday season, we’re already looking ahead to 2015. We’ve been hard at work thinking of possible colors for the 2015 candy cane the past few months, but this time around you get the final say as to which color hits store shelves. Continue reading

Just Added to Our Digital Collections: Eagle Tavern Images

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We’re continuing with the project we started this summer, digitizing materials related to our historic buildings in Greenfield Village. This week, we’ve added images of Eagle Tavern. Today, Eagle Tavern is a great place to have a historically authentic meal or beverage (either temperance or non-temperance). However, when Henry Ford acquired it in 1927 from its original location in Clinton, Michigan, the building was in a state of deep disrepair. This sheet shows this poor condition from a couple of different angles. Visit our collections website to view nearly 100 artifacts depicting or related to Eagle Tavern.

Ellice Engdahl is Digital Collections & Content Manager at The Henry Ford.

Recipe: The Henry Ford’s Kale Salad

Salads, like this selection of ready-to-go options offered at The Henry Ford, are a great choice for a healthier lunch for students.

Salads, like this selection of ready-to-go options offered at The Henry Ford, are a great choice as a healthier lunch for students.

Looking for an easy salad to make that’s both healthy and good tasting? Try our simple kale salad, a favorite recipe from Executive Chef Mike Trombley that is often served to Henry Ford Academy students here at The Henry Ford.

In an ongoing effort to provide nutritious and crowd-pleasing menu items to our students that meet the nutrition guidelines provided by the USDA, Chef Mike and his team add ingredients like garlic, beets and other items with bold flavor to lunch dishes as they try to avoid relying too much on ingredients such as salt and butter. The resulting combination is a healthy dish that’s good for the students.

Try adding this salad to your next meal for a dose of greens you’ll look forward to enjoying.

The Henry Ford’s Kale Salad
Ingredients

  • 4 ounces baby kale, or tender leaf kale
  • 4 each cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 2 Tbsp dried cranberries
  • 2 Tbsp shredded carrot
  • 2 Tbsp toasted sunflower seeds
  • 1 Tbsp low sodium feta cheese
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  •  1 Tbsp olive oil

Method
Layer kale and additional items then drizzle lemon juice and oil over top and enjoy.

Rebecca Hillary is a Media & Film Relations Intern at The Henry Ford.

Hanukkah: Festival of Lights

American society became more child-centered as the birthrate climbed after World War II. Like other aspects of American life during this “baby boom” era, Jewish ritual observances in the home became more child-focused, as reflected in this 1953 publication. (Object ID.2005.29.32) (Gift of Judith E. Endelman and William D. Epstein in memory of Miriam Ruth Epstein)

American society became more child-centered as the birthrate climbed after World War II. Like other aspects of American life during this “baby boom” era, Jewish ritual observances in the home became more child-focused, as reflected in this 1953 publication. (Object ID.2005.29.32) (Gift of Judith E. Endelman and William D. Epstein in memory of Miriam Ruth Epstein)

The Jewish holiday of Hanukkah celebrates the victory of the few and the weak over the mighty and the strong.  Legends and stories surround the holiday’s origins, whose name means “dedication” in Hebrew.

For centuries, Hanukkah was a modest occasion, a minor holiday. Jewish law and custom only required the lighting of candles for eight nights, with one candle to be used as the shamash (“guard” or “servant” in Hebrew) to light the others. The lighted candles were to be kept by a window where they could be seen by passers-by. In Eastern Europe, the celebration included eating latkes (potato pancakes), distributing small amounts of Hanukkah gelt (coins) to children, playing games with a dreidel (a spinning top), and playing cards. Continue reading

Five Must-see Attractions on a Cross-Country Road Trip

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Expedia Viewfinder and The Henry Ford teamed up to discuss some of the best places to visit.

Expedia Viewfinder and Henry Ford Museum teamed up to discuss some of the best places to visit.

Expedia Viewfinder and Henry Ford Museum teamed up to discuss some of the best places to visit.

Henry Ford’s invention of the Model T put Americans in the driver’s seat. His affordable automobile made everything from running errands and commuting to work to taking Sunday drives and embarking on road trips possible for ordinary people. The Model T transformed the way Americans traveled and paved the road for the future of vehicles.

Expedia Viewfinder discovered that Henry Ford Museum refreshed its Driving America exhibit not too long ago, and we got to thinking about how these antique vehicles have contributed to our own opportunities for modern-day travel. With a set of wheels, we can tour unique corners of the country and witness unrivaled beauty at our leisure. Since it was Henry Ford who made road tripping possible in the first place, it only seemed fitting to partner up with The Henry Ford, home of the country’s premier automotive museum, to discuss some of our favorite routes and roadside attractions.

Some of the nation’s most scenic areas are best viewed from behind the steering wheel with the windows rolled down. So on your next open-road adventure, buckle up, rev your engine, and cruise over to these must-see attractions: Continue reading

Soybeans: Henry Ford’s Miracle Crop

This model was used to demonstrate the soybean extraction process at several world’s fairs in the 1930s. (THF 153893)

This model was used to demonstrate the soybean extraction process at several world’s fairs in the 1930s. (THF 153893)

Soybeans: A New Hope for Farmers
In the 1920s, following his success with the Model T, Henry Ford increasingly turned his attention to transforming farming—the life he sought to escape as a boy.  He focused on finding new products and new markets for agriculture. (The charcoal briquette was an early result of this effort, made from surplus wood scrap.)

In 1928, Ford started the Chemical Lab (the building in Greenfield Village now known as the Soybean Lab), and asked Robert Boyer, a student at the Ford Trade School to run it.  Ford told Boyer to select good students from the Trade School to staff the Lab. Ford then set them to experimenting with all manner of agricultural produce, from cantaloupes to rutabagas. Continue reading

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